• Nate Adams

Review: Stylish horror comedy 'Bloody Hell' kicks ass


Courtesy of The Horror Collective

Equal parts Dr Jekell and Mr Hyde with a silver of “You’re Next,” Ailster Grierson’s “Bloody Hell” is a deliciously good time from start to finish. Screenwriter Robert Benjamin cooks up good spooks, laughs, and grotesque mutilations as Ben O’Toole’s Rex Coen, a dude recently released from prison after accidently getting a bank teller killed during a robbery, has to fight for his life.


On the prowl for a fresh start, Rex packs his bags and heads abroad only to find himself in a darker (and terrifying) situation. He awakens inside an abandoned garage hung like dead cattle ready for slaughter with his lower leg missing. Luckily, his alter-ego (also played with tenacity by O’Toole) is there to help rummage through his scarce options. Turns out, a sadistic family has taken him captive for reasons too delicious to spoil, but let's just say the clock is ticking and time is of the essence.


Strung up for most of the film and playing dueling roles, O’Toole shows he’s no longer a supporting actor, and can hold a film on his shoulders. Weather it’s trying to calculate (with himself) how to maneuver out of his situation, debating Stephen King’s “Misery,” or utilizing pretty boy smolder to charm the young girl who's curious about him, O’Toole is pure delight, and when the blood starts flowing and the action kicks into gear, “Bloody Hell” keeps the momentum fierce and focused.


Punctuated with a fun soundtrack and a slick nod to “The Evil Dead,” “Bloody Hell” is arguably the first big surprise of 2021 and should quench horror geeks thirst. “Bloody Hell” isn’t revolutionary, but it accomplishes plenty in 95 minutes, and plastered a big dumb smile on my face. If every B-movie could kick this much ass, we’d all be in a much better place.


Grade: B


BLOODY HELL opens in select theaters, Drive-Ins and On Demand January 14th 2021